Archive for College

Nov
28

Amazon US Deal 30% OFF Any Book!

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Amazon - Letter A with Green AlligatorAmazon US Coupon Code Deal!

Take an Extra 30% OFF ANY BOOK!

Use Promo Code HOLIDAY30 at Checkout to get an Extra 30% OFF any book for a limited time.

Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks.

 

Caveat Lector: I used this coupon deal today and it worked once. It will not work on a subsequent order, so choose your book carefully!

 

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Do you have more than one person on your Christmas list that is hard to buy for?

How about an authentic JFK Rocking Chair, identical in every respect to the chair used by President John F Kennedy during his tenure in the White House? The chair is adorned with a small brass plaque featuring Kennedy’s signature!

Rocking Chair used by President JFK

For $469.00 the chair is yours!

For $600.00 you can park the rocker on a wool rug featuring the Great Seal of the United States!


Wool Rug Great Seal of the USA

You can find more reasonably priced items featuring JFK, Jacqueline Kennedy, and other Kennedy family members in the online store of the John F Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.

Baby bibs, jewelry, posters, books, DVD’s,Christmas ornaments – you can buy a little bit of everything, and some prices are budget conscious and under $10.00:

http://store.jfklibrary.org/

Presidential Libraries Offer Unique Gifts

The US National Archives maintains many Presidential Libraries, and they all have gift shops. You can buy ornaments and other unique gifts at any one of them:

Remember Barbara Bush’s pearls? Get your own!

DEA, NASA, White House, WWII

You can also buy all kinds of gifts and souvenirs from other government agencies and institutions. Wow your nephew or teenager with a NASA, DEA, or White House Situation Room hat or jacket:

NASA jacket, t-shirt, Situation Room hat

 

There are all kinds of neat things in the Smithsonian Institution Shop. You can find something for everyone here:

Deck The Walls

Do you have a college student on your list? Amtrak offers some great looking posters of some of the famous train routes, and the prices are not bad. You can buy posters from $2.00 to $10.00:

When all else fails, buy a good old US Savings Bond!

Are you making a list and checking it twice? Have you started your Christmas shopping yet?

Do you use savings to buy Christmas gifts, or are you saying “charge it!” this year?

What is the size of your gift budget this holiday season?

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Categories : Budget, College, Save Money
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Nov
13

Give Your Money Away – Tax Free!

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The end of the year is coming fast, which makes tax season right around the next corner.  Quite a lot of people receive income tax refunds, so they are in a hurry to file and get that money back! There are bills to pay and things to do!  The kids need shoes! 

There are things you can do now that will make filing your income taxes easier when the time comes.  In the coming months I’ll be writing about different tax topics you should be aware of, and tax saving tips you can use to get back the maximum refund you’re owed! 

White Gift Box with Red Ribbon BowJanie is a friend of mine, and every year her parents gift Janie and her husband Steve a 5 figure check – each.  This year, each of them received $13,000 from her parents – for a total of $26,000 – and that is completely tax free income.  Janie and Steve don’t owe any taxes on the money, and Janie’s parents don’t have to pay any gift taxes for giving their money away.

If your estate is sizable, and you’re trying to minimize estate taxes, you can use the Annual Gift Tax Exclusion to reduce your estate tax liability.  You can give away up to $13,000 tax free this year to any individual, and to as many individuals as you want – and, if you are married filing joint, your spouse can also give $13,000 to the same people.  Tax free!

According to the tax code, any gift is a taxable gift.  Gifts can be property, money, the use of property, or the right to receive income from a property.  According to the tax code, there are exceptions to this “any gift is a taxable gift” rule.  (Of course there are, Congress wouldn’t have it any other way!)

The following gifts are usually not considered taxable:

  • Gifts that are not more than the annual calendar year exclusion (from 2009 through 2012 this has been $13,000 annually for each gift)
  • Tuition or medical bills paid for someone else (you must pay the institution directly, not the person)
  • Gifts to your spouse
  • Gifts to a political organization
  • Gifts to charities

If someone receives a gift that is valued at more than $13,000, taxes are owed on the amount that is above the $13,000 exclusion.

Any gift you receive is not treated as income.  The person giving the gift is responsible for paying the gift tax.

For example:

1.  Mary gave Joe a cash gift of $9,000 during the calendar year.  This gift is not taxable because it is under the $13,000 exclusion.

2.  Jack gave Susan a cash gift of $16,000 during the calendar year to pay for college tuition.  IF Jack had paid this gift directly to the state university Susan attended, the entire $16,000 would be non-taxable due to the education exclusion.  BUT, Jack gave Susan the money personally – so the first $13,000 is not taxable due to the annual exclusion, but the remaining $3,000 is considered a taxable gift.  Jack, as the donor or gift giver, is responsible for paying any gift tax due.

3.  Aunt Joan gave Lisa $20,000 cash to purchase a used car.  The first $13,000 of this gift falls under the yearly exclusion and is not considered taxable, but the remaining $7,000 is considered a taxable gift.  Aunt Joan is responsible for paying any gift tax due.

4.  Pete and Sally are married.  Sally gave a cash gift of $25,000 to her daughter during the calendar year.  Pete gave his son a gift of $15,000.  Neither of the gifts are taxable, both are completely excluded from the the gift tax.

This example messed up your thinking, didn’t it?  If Sally gave her daughter $25,000, then the amount over $13,000, which is $12,000, should be taxable, right?  What about the gift Pete gave his son – that was $15,000, or $2000 over the exclusion limit.  That $2000 is taxable, isn’t it?

Not so fast.

When you are married, and both spouses agree to the gift, Gift Splitting becomes a factor.  When Pete and Sally agreed to split the gifts they made during the year, each gift was split equally between the two of them.  That $25,000 Sally gifted her daughter?  When split, Sally gave $12,500 and Pete gave $12,500 – this is under the exclusion amount of $13,000, and therefore this gift is not taxable.  The same math works with Pete’s son:  his gift was $15,000, but when equally split between Sally and Pete, the gift becomes $7500 from each – well under the $13,000 exclusion and not taxable.

Take a minute and realize how powerful a tool this can be – you can get creative and give gifts that will benefit you as well as the gift receiver.  You can gift your children yearly to the max, and not only build a nest egg for their future, you can do it relatively tax free.

Let’s try one more example:

5.  This year, Sonny decided to give 10 of his grandchildren checks for $13,000 each.  Sonny also paid the college tuition for a nephew, writing a check to the local college for $15,000.  Sonny paid a local hospital $14,000 for medical care his son, Carl, received.  The $14,000 bill was the balance due after Carl’s health insurance paid in full.  Carl was off work for 3 months, recuperating from his injuries.  During this time, Sonny also paid $2500 in health insurance premiums for his son.  Carl’s wife, Connie, took an unpaid leave of absence from her job to care for Carl.  Sonny gave Connie a gift of $25,000 to replace her lost income.  Sonny gave $20,000 to Shari, a good friend of his.  Shari promptly sailed to Hawaii.  Sonny also gave $25,000 to his sister, Ellen.

  • None of the $130,000 gifted to the grandchildren is considered a taxable gift.  The $13,000 exclusion applies in each case.
  • The $15,000 paid for college tuition falls under the education exclusion.  This gift is non-taxable.
  • The $16,500 Sonny paid for Carl’s medical bills and health insurance premiums is non-taxable due to the medical exclusion.  (Sonny paid the hospital and the insurance company directly, which classifies this as medical exclusion.  If Carl would have been paid directly, only $13,000 would have been excluded from tax)
  • The first $13,000 of Connie’s gift is not taxable.  $12,000 remains after applying the exclusion and is considered taxable.
  • $7000 of the gift Sonny gave Shari is taxable.  ($20,000 – $13,000 = $7000)
  • Sonny owes gift tax on $12,000 of the gift he gave Ellen.  ($25,000 – $13,000 = $12,000)
  • Sonny gave away $231,500 in cash gifts this year.  $31,000 of that is subject to gift tax.

Sonny will be required to file a Form 709, US Gift Tax Return, and $6,220.00 in taxes will be assessed on the $31,000 we’ve determined is the taxable amount of all the gifts Sonny gave this year.  But guess what?  Sonny won’t pay a dime in gift tax.

I’ve really confused you now, haven’t I?  (Please don’t bang your head on your desk, and stop pulling your hair – this will eventually make sense) Let me explain about the Unified Credit to Gift Tax.

You see, because Congress writes the tax code, and because Congress is made up of of millionaires and billionaires, they write the tax code to benefit themselves and their friends.  Become familiar with what is in the tax code as it applies to your situation, and use the law to your benefit.

In addition to an Annual Gift Tax Exclusion amount, and in addition to a list of gifts that are not considered taxable, there is a Unified Credit available.  This credit is used to eliminate and/or reduce any gift tax due.  As an added bonus, any Unified Credit not used to eliminate gift tax can be used to eliminate or reduce estate tax.

Back in 1979, the Unified Credit available was capped at $38,000.  In the year 2012, the Unified Credit is $1,772,800.  (The Unified Credit to may increase – it was steady at $330,800 from 2002 through 2010, but then jumped to $1,730,800 in 2011 and increased another $42,000 in 2012)

Remember:  this is a tax credit – as you can see by the example above, $31,000 in gifts generated $6220 in tax – the Unified Credit available is $1,772,800 – and Sonny will use this credit to offset his gift tax due.  Tax credits are applied to tax due, reducing or eliminating tax.  A tax credit “pays” for the tax instead of you – and everyone gets the credit.

Do you understand how powerful gift giving can be when it comes to reducing your estate tax burden?  You can give away your money, not pay any taxes on it when giving it away, reduce your estate, and in the end save major dollars when it comes to any estate tax assessed!  Set up accounts for your children, gift them to the max, and they don’t have to report the gift as income.  It sounds unbelievable, doesn’t it?  See how nice Congress is when it comes to making the law concerning gifts and taxes – and take note that one of those examples above of non-taxable gifts is money given to “political organizations”!

I hope I’ve given you food for thought when it comes to your income, giving cash gifts throughout the year if you can afford it, building wealth for family members, and possible tax strategies when it comes to the tax on those gifts and your estate.

 

There is a spirit in the world of generosity that brings good things to all of us, whoever we may be … A Christmas Carol

Note:  Please consult a qualified tax professional when mapping out your gift giving.  This is a brief overview, and there are more rules when it comes to the definition of a non-taxable gift.  If a husband and wife are gift-splitting, certain tax forms must be filed.  The gifts you give may or may not have have to be reported to the IRS.  When gifting to grandchildren, Generation-skipping Transfer Tax may apply.  Giving away real property may come with tax disadvantages, and may be better left in an estate until death.  Usually, the gift giver is responsible for paying the gift tax, but if he doesn’t, the gift recipient may have to pay the gift tax.  Nest eggs built for children could impact them in a negative way when it comes to qualifying for college financial aid.  Exclusion and credit amounts are subject to change based on changes to the current law.

 

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Oct
04

Free One-on-One Financial Planning Help

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Financial Planning Day What is Financial Planning?

What financial goals would you like to obtain?  What’s on your “Wish List” when it comes to money?

Do you want to buy a home?  Do you own your home, but dream about a vacation home in the mountains or a weekend home at the lake?

Do the kids want to go to Disney World next summer, but you’re not sure you can afford a local pool pass for the season?

Are you able to save today for college for the kids, or have you put that off until tomorrow? Tomorrow is already here, you know.

What about your retirement – how many retirement accounts do you have, and do you regularly fund those to the max?  Is your retirement diversified, or do you have all of your eggs in one basket?  Can you retire without Social Security and live in the manner to which you are now accustomed?  Have you thought about retirement very much, or is that something you’re going to do “tomorrow”?

Financial planning is a must, no matter who you are or what your circumstances are.  What is your financial plan right now?  What strategy do you have in place – right now – that will allow you to retire financially independent?  Do you know where to start to make your financial dreams your reality?  Do you know how to make your dreams your reality?  Are you lost when it comes to implementing changes to your money situation?

We all have money dreams, but most of us aren’t smart enough to know how to make our dreams come true.  We don’t have the time to do the research we need in order to know where to invest, or how, or how much.  We don’t know what goal to tackle first.  We aren’t sure of the quickest way to the goal line.  We’re lost when it comes to the math.  We need help.  During the month of October 2012, personal, one-on-one help is available in many cities across the country.

Financial Planning Days Initiative

During the month of October 2012, “Financial Planning Days Initiative” is taking place.  Four different non-profit organizations**  are bringing together highly qualified, professional, Certified Financial Planners to provide one-on-one counseling sessions to the public.  There will also be classroom style learning sessions held, and free packets of financial literature given away.  All of the work being done by the professionals is on a volunteer basis, and no payment is expected.  Services are free.  You can sit down with a financial planner and ask for personal advice – with no strings attached.  The volunteers will not try to sell you anything, they won’t even give you their business card.  No business will be promoted at all – the professionals are there to answer your questions and help – that’s it.  (If you are a professional, certified financial planner and would like to volunteer, you can find out how here)

Gather your questions about retirement planning, debt, credit issues, budget questions, taxes, college, mortgage loans, investments, estate planning, small business finance, and insurance together, and find out if the Initiative is available where you live:

Click here to find a Financial Planning Day in your area

A list of 2012 events can be found by clicking here

A list of participating states:

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Maryland
  • Minnesota
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Virgina
  • Washington

Can’t go?  You Can Still Get the Same Information Packet Being Handed Out

If there is no Financial Planning Initiative in your state, the free information packet information is still available to you and can be found at the links below.  Take a look at the information available, and give yourself a quick education in the basics of financial planning.  Pick up tips and advice on everything from a college savings plan to long term care insurance.

You Can Organize & Simplify Your Financial Life:  A How To Guide

Saving and Investing:  A Roadmap to Your Financial Security Through Saving and Investing

Savings Fitness:  A Guide to Your Money & Your Financial Future

Smart Saving for College – 529 Plans & Other College Savings Options

Guide to Disability Income Insurance

Guide to Long Term Care Insurance

Consumer Guide to Financial Self-Defense

 

** Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc.®, Financial Planning Association®, the Foundation for Financial Planning, and the U.S. Conference of Mayors

 

 

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