Archive for Debt

May
31

Don’t Pay This Tax Bill!

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Green piggy bank with tax bill of $1000

 

The email caught me off-guard. It was short and to the point:

Hello again! I have a question for you. We received a letter from the state saying that adjustments need to be made to our income tax return and that we owe $580. It says that if we disagree then we can send them back more information. Do you have any suggestions on what we should do?

My first reaction was to snort and say, “No way!”

My next reaction was concern – concern that this was a new tax client, and first return filed out of the gate they receive a letter from the state demanding money instead of the $350 tax refund they were owed. My third reaction was to groan, knowing that somewhere between the envelope being opened at the state tax office and input into the state computer system, a W-2 had been lost.  How long would this take to fix?

The adjustment notice from the state told the taxpayer that a change had been made in the amount of withholding they had claimed. Because the withholding amount used in the state calculation was less than what was claimed on the return, an anticipated refund was suddenly a balance due.

Quickly checking the math in the notice against my records, it took me about two minutes to find the mistake and verify my fear.

The total state income tax withholding my client claimed on his tax return was $1690.00. The state adjusted that withholding down and used a figure of $830.00.

$1690 – $830 = $860.00

Somewhere, $860 in state withholding had evaporated between the time the return was prepared and the time the state processed the paper. The first thing I did was check the state withholding amounts on the W-2’s of the taxpayer.

Guess what. One of the W-2’s had state income tax withholding of $860.00. It was pretty easy to see that a missing W-2 caused the problem. This is actually a very common mistake at the final processing level. It’s also a common mistake for the taxpayer to forget to include his W-2 with his filed return, or to make a math error when adding his withholding among multiple W-2’s.

This error, although it wasn’t made by the taxpayer, is going to take some time and effort to fix. I’ll write a letter disputing the notice the taxpayer received, explaining the missing W-2 is the reason the withholding was adjusted down. Copies of the W-2 must be attached to the letter to substantiate the case. I’ll make liberal use a bright yellow highlighter to make my point. Once the state receives that information, they will make an adjustment on the case and issue the taxpayer his refund – a few months late.

Hopefully, the adjustments will be agreed to and made without incident. The first correspondence might not do the trick – it may take another letter or a phone call. Remember, they lost the W-2 in the first place!

You should never take any letter from any tax agency, telling you a mistake was made and you owe a bill, as gospel. If you don’t understand the adjustments the tax agency is making to your tax return and your account, contact your tax preparer and discuss your case. Take all letters you’ve received from the tax entity to your preparer.

When you’re dealing with changes being made to your tax return:

  • Make sure you understand completely and agree with the changes being made to your tax return before they are made.
  • Don’t ignore tax correspondence – all letters are sent out on a timed schedule and by law you have certain appeal rights, but if you’ve got 60 days to respond and you don’t decide to answer until Day 90, you’re out of time and too late.   Once Day 60 passes with no contact from you, their changes will become permanent.  If the law says you’ve got 60 days, that means 60 days, not 61.
  • If you choose to ignore the tax agency letters and blow your appeal time frame, the changes will become permanent.
  • If you don’t agree with the proposed changes to your account, present your case in a clear and concise manner. Include copies of the original correspondence to you, your reply, and all exhibits needed to back up your argument.  Keep everything brief but to the point.  They’ve already made the changes. You will have to change their mind.
  • If you prepared your own taxes and don’t know whether you made a mistake or not, make an appointment with a local tax professional and show them the letter. Ask your friends and neighbors for referrals. The best tax experts are often found locally. Personally, I would avoid any of the large tax prep companies and go with a local tax preparer or accountant that comes highly recommended.

Have you ever been on the receiving end of an IRS or state tax agency collection letter?

Were you able to resolve the situation without trading in your first-born?

 

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May
22

Roy: 74, Bankrupt, & It Isn’t His Debt

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Gavel in CourtRoy’s birthday is next week, and instead of spending the day with a fishing pole and a camp chair on the creek bank, he’ll be in federal bankruptcy court. The day of his hearing, Roy will drive two hours from his home into the city, alone.

Roy really doesn’t understand all the fine print on the paperwork, or the lawyer-speak. Roy really doesn’t have a clue how he hit financial rock bottom so quickly after the death of his wife.

What Roy does understand is that in order to keep his home, he must declare bankruptcy and stop any action that could be taken against him on a recent court judgment.

Roy and June were married 55 years. Roy did not handle the finances in the marriage. June did. June passed away after a very short illness, and suddenly Roy was on his own when it came to his money and the bills. If you ask him, Roy can’t tell you the name of his insurance agent.

Gene, Roy’s son, had been helping his mother balance her checking account at times during the previous year. Gene had on-line access to the account, and after having his name added, it was easy for Gene to step in and start paying the bills for his father.  Roy lucked out there.

What Gene wasn’t prepared for was the large stack of paper he found in the old desk in his parent’s living room. Past due credit card bills, collection notices, letters from lawyers, past-due medical bills – there was a lot to sort through,and it took Gene days.

The final picture that emerged was not pretty. Roy owed approximately $20,000 in non-secured debt, in addition to his home mortgage. Of the $20,000 in non-secured debt, $1500 were medical bills in Roy’s name. The remaining debt did not belong to Roy, but it was in his name – and he was getting sued for most of it.

June had taken out credit cards in Roy’s name and given them to her son, Tom, with a promise from Tom that he’d pay the bills. Tom quickly maxed out the cards – and left his mother holding the bag. Tom’s wife bought a bunch of new appliances, and bought Roy a chair, all on credit. When she didn’t pay, they came after Roy for the $5000 balance because his name was on the contract.  That turned out to be an expensive chair.

It was the judgment, recently entered against Roy for the furniture bill, that landed Roy in federal bankruptcy court.

At 74, Roy’s credit is ruined for the rest of his life. The bankruptcy could also affect his insurance rates, and the mortgage loan that is due to balloon in 3 years. Roy is paying an interest only mortgage payment now. He can’t afford for his mortgage interest rate to go up.

Roy filed Chapter 7 bankruptcy, which means all of the non-secured debt will be wiped out. He won’t have to pay the debt back, and none of the creditors can take any judgment enforcement action against him, such as levying his checking account or putting a lien on his house.  In the overall scheme of things, $20,000 is not enough to declare bankruptcy over.  In Roy’s case, however, he’s elderly and on a fixed income.  If his checking account is garnisheed, he’ll starve.

Roy really doesn’t understand any of this, because he never played an active role in his finances. Gene, of course, blames himself. He should have made it his business to know, he thinks. Maybe he could have stopped things from getting to this point, he thinks – if he only knew.

 

  • Are you actively involved in your parent’s finances, or the finances of a elderly relative?
  • Do you know if your parents have loaned money to anyone or given anyone their credit cards? What kind of financial hit would they take if they lost that money?
  • Do you owe your parents money? What would happen to them if you couldn’t pay them back?
  • If you’re married or in a significant relationship, who pays the bills?
  • How involved are you in your finances?
  • Do you know the name of your insurance agent?

 

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Nov
12

A Death In The Family

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White Dove in FlightTwo weeks ago, my mother-in-law passed away very unexpectedly.  She left a surviving spouse, four children, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.  She did not leave any life insurance.  She did not have any sort of pre-paid burial plan in place, nor were any funeral arrangements made in advance.

When a death occurs in a family, the living are busy grieving.  On top of the emotional hit that happens, there are many things to do when it comes to a funeral.  We had people coming in from out of town and out of state to stay here for most of the week, others stopping by as they were coming and going.  In addition to shopping for extra groceries, we were also shopping for new clothes to wear to the service.  For almost a week, daily trips were made “home” and back, driving more than an hour each way.  A lot of stress was added to the grief.

Take a minute, right now, to stop and think about your own situation.  What is in store for your loved ones when faced with your demise?  It could happen tomorrow, you know – or six months from now.  Or six years.  Or 60 years.  There is only one thing absolute in life, and that is death.  You never know when it is going to happen – and that’s the rub.  You just don’t know.

When death happens, when your family is grieving, do you want your loved ones to suddenly have to deal with a lot of decisions concerning your death and funeral?  There are medical decisions to be made, legal decisions, financial decisions, plus many more.  Do you want family members arguing about what casket to choose, what music to play, or what pictures should be selected for the video memorial?  Do you want your loved ones to make your funeral arrangements based on what may or may not be in their bank account, or yours?  Do you want to leave your loved ones struggling emotionally and financially over what kind of service they want to give you vs. what they can really afford?

Death is a necessary part of financial planning.  You should treat life insurance as a mandatory expense, as mandatory as your car insurance, or your homeowners policy.  There are situations where life insurance may not be a viable or affordable choice, and there are alternatives.  Pre-paid funeral plans are available through just about every mortician or funeral home.  Buy a plan now and have it in place for the future – it doesn’t matter if you are 26 or 76.  Do it now.

A funeral home here in my village has a pre-paid program that allows you to make all of your funeral arrangements in advance.  You decide what kind of ceremony to have, whether there will be a casket and what color, what kind of vault, and does that vault need a name plate, what kind of flowers, the type of music, what kind of printed funeral programs, how many pall bearers, whether there should be a family car – there is a long list of decisions when it comes to a funeral. Prices are locked in at the time you make the arrangements.  The funeral home will present you with a price quote and a contract.  You can pay in full or set up a payment plan.  Payment plans are normally set up through a third party (usually a bank), who collects the money in trust and forwards it to the funeral home.  Everything is arranged and paid for in advance.  When the time comes, your family will be dealing with the only thing they should have to deal with at your passing – their grief.

Most funeral homes will also work with you if life insurance is pending when death occurs.  When my grandmother passed away twenty years ago, she had all of her funeral arrangements in place, down to her dress.  She had made a partial payment when she set up the arrangements years before, and she had life insurance.  The funeral took place, and a month later when the life insurance paid out, the balance due was paid.  If you do have life insurance that will be used for your funeral, you still need make your own funeral arrangements.  Don’t leave that kind of stress to your family.  It’s going to be all they can do to handle the loss of you.

Can your survivors survive the sudden financial burden of a funeral?  A few years ago, a grandfather died in our family.  We soon found out that his life insurance policy had been cashed in a few years before, and there was no pre-paid funeral plan or funeral arrangements made in advance.  It fell to a few of the grandkids to pay for his funeral.  At the time, we were able to write a check for our portion – but can your family do the same?  Can your family afford to be saddled with a bank or finance company loan and a monthly payment that will be due 30 days after your death and continue for 2 to 5 years?

None of us want to leave our loved ones with these type of circumstances.  Pick up the phone, get quotes on a term life insurance policy, and set that up to automatically pay through your bank account or a credit card.  Check into pre-paid funeral plans, check the history and reputation of the company, make those plans, and pay that bill while you are living.  Do it today, and do it for your family.

You must prepare for the only absolute in life you can count on:  your death.

 

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Oct
15

Get Your Free Obama Phone!

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The Obama Lady 

The political ads and graphics are everywhere:  TV, newspaper, YouTube, Facebook, email – we’re inundated 24/7 with political advertising, and most of it isn’t very nice.  One of the not-so-nice videos I’ve seen floating around Facebook via YouTube is “The Obama Lady”.

The video is of a woman, jumping around and waving a poster board sign in a reporter’s face, all the while ranting about her “Free Obama Phone”.  In 2008, an email with the same script made the rounds, but four years down the road, technology has moved the email to video.  “The Obama Lady” video is tasteless, with the intent to convince the public that their tax dollars are going to give free cell phones, courtesy of President Obama, to every disadvantaged person in Cleveland, and, in turn, the entire country.  It’s an effort to embarrass and disenfranchise the poor among us, and generate anger toward the current White House Administration.

Lifeline Phone ServiceA few things in the video ARE true.

The government does give out “free” phones.  They’ve been doing it for almost 30 years, based on a Congressional mandate that ensures communication is available to all Americans.

In 1985, a program named “Lifeline” was started that gave discounted phone service to the poor, the elderly, disabled veterans, and the sick.  “Lifeline” was there so that if someone needed to call 911 due to an emergency, or make an appointment with their doctor, or call and check on a job application because they were unemployed and trying to find work, they could.  If Grandma fell and broke her hip, she had a phone to call for an ambulance, even when her Social Security check didn’t reach far enough each month to cover the phone bill.  The program started by furnishing land-line service, and expanded in 2005 to include limited, pre-paid cell phone service.

Do You Need a Hand-Up, Not A Hand-out?

The “Lifeline” program is available in every state, but it doesn’t come without rules and regulations.  Since its beginning, the program has required that anyone participating must have an income at or below the poverty line or participate in one of the following low-income assistance programs:

  • Medicaid
  • Food Stamps or SNAP
  • SSI
  • Section 8 Housing
  • Low-income energy assistance
  • Free school lunch program
  • Bureau of Indian Affairs General Assistance
  • Temporary Assistance to Needy Families
  • Head Start
  • State assistance programs (if applicable)

There are other rules, too.  Only one Lifeline phone is allowed per household.  The household can have a land line or a cell phone, but not both.  The program doesn’t come with a lot of bells and whistles – this is basic and limited phone service.  The cell phone service is pre-paid with a limited number of minutes, and the land line is limited in service.  You’ve got to reconfirm eligibility on an annual basis in order to remain in the program.

Are You Eligible?  Is Grandma? 

If you’re interested in the Lifeline program, start by calling your phone company.  Over 2,000 phone companies across the country provide discounted phone service through Lifeline.  You can find a list of companies by state here:

Lifeline Support Companies By State

You can also use the Lifeline Pre-Screening Tool and check eligibility status.  It takes about 15 minutes:

Lifeline Pre-Screening Tool

 

Learn more about Lifeline here:

USAC – What Is Lifeline?

Lifeline Program for Low-Income Consumers

Lifeline Public Service Announcements 

 

Who Pays for Lifeline?

The phone companies contribute a percentage of their revenues to the Universal Service Fund (USF).  Your phone service provider may charge you a service charge called “Universal Service” if they try to recoup part of the cost of the program from customers.  The USF is administered by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Universal Service Administration (USAC), which pays for the discounted Lifeline phone service out of the fund.

The USF is also responsible for other communication programs.  In addition to Lifeline, the fund also makes discounts available to schools and libraries for telecommunication services, Internet access, and information services.  Rural health care providers, through the fund, have the capability to link to city hospitals and medical centers, giving rural America access to medical services they wouldn’t normally have available.

Find out more about the USF and FCC here:

FCC Consumer Guide

 

 

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How to Plan Your Budget When You are in Financial CrisisAlicia is a financial tech writer from the UK, and is guest posting today with interesting budget ideas that you may use in dealing with a financial crisis.

 

An unexpected and unavoidable financial crisis can be difficult for anyone to overcome, especially when income levels are low and debt levels are very high. If you are facing such a situation in your life then it is time to plan and evaluate the situation, and create a budget plan to handle your financial crisis. Here are a few steps that help you to create an effective budget plan when you are in financial crisis:

Step 1: Determine your expenses; this will enable you to know how much you are spending every month and where your income is going. Writing down all your expenses and analysing your spending habits is a good to start in creating an efficient budget plan. Start with your monthly income and check for any opportunity to save your money by trimming unwanted expenses; this could help you save lot of your money.

Step 2: Analyse your spending and trim expenses especially whilst in the midst of financial crisis, this means eliminating all the unnecessary expenses. If you have any monthly financial obligations such as paying off your mortgage, auto loan and so on then allocate your income to fund those expenses, don’t delay any monthly bills as they could increase due to late fees.

Step 3: Another important step you can take when you are in financial crisis is to reduce your utility or monthly bills.  Make a list of fixed and variable costs in your budget plan; this is how you can save some money wherever possible.

Step 4: Your savings account is very useful to resolve your emergency situation; it is very difficult to save money from your income while in financial crisis. Consider payday loans which are the short-term loans that are secured against the borrower’s next pay cheque, they don’t require any collateral and even a person with bad credit can avail urgent cash to resolve their financial emergency.

Step 5: If you could develop an efficient budget plan that suits your lifestyle then it is just a good idea to save some money. Adjust your plan if your income is not balanced with your regular expenses, review your budget frequently and find the easiest way to stick to your budget plan. Find an extra source of income if you cannot fund your basic needs through just a single income. There are plenty ways you can earn some money with a part time job.

Author Bio

My name is Alicia. I am a tech writer from UK. I am into Finance. Catch me @financeport

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Oct
11

Emergency! Emergency!

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No Job SignSix months ago, April 6th, on Good Friday (oh, the irony!) – my husband lost the job he had for 13 years. This came completely out of the blue, with no warning. I now know what the bug hitting the zapper in the back yard feels like.

Once the initial shock wore off, we took stock. We had an Emergency Fund, and my husband was owed vacation pay. When I added the two together, we had approx. $25,000 cash. I knew we’d be alright for a few months with the emergency fund, but I also knew we’d have to cut spending to the bone. We didn’t have any credit card debt, nor any car payments, which was a big plus. Those are expenses that can drain finances quickly. We did have a mortgage, insurance, utilities, food, gas – basic and necessary expenses that kept the roof over our heads, the Internet lights on, and food on the table.

I wasn’t overly worried. MrBP is good at his job. I knew the phone would be ringing fairly soon with a job offer, or he’d be able to network a bit and find an opening. This layoff was going to be just a little bump in the road in the overall scheme of things, and we would be fine.

The first thing MrBP did was file for unemployment. Unemployment in this country is not fair to the unemployed, as I’m sure anyone out of work will tell you. MrBP did qualify for the maximum amount of weekly unemployment: $320.00. Wow. I know $320 is better than nothing, but a month of unemployment checks still wouldn’t cover the mortgage. MrBP could also draw unemployment for the maximum number of weeks: 20. Another Wow. Twenty weeks of unemployment equals thirteen years of work history. If he had worked the for company for 30 years, 20 weeks was still the maximum number of weeks he could draw. There is something wrong with that government math!

When a person files for unemployment it takes some time to get that first check. Remember that vacation pay I mentioned? That had to be claimed as income for 3 weeks.  (If what you claim is more than the amount you’re eligible for – you don’t get paid unemployment that week)  At the end of the 3 “vacation” weeks, a waiting week had to be “put in”. This happens to everyone – the first week you are unemployed basically doesn’t count – for anything. Unemployment benefits don’t become available until the second week a person is out of work. Checks don’t come the second week either – the process of being approved for unemployment can take 2-3 weeks, or much longer. Considering the majority of the working population lives paycheck to paycheck, losing a job can be a big deal. All of this waiting for money is going on when people need that money the most!

MrBP was out of work for a month. He never did draw an unemployment check, because the 3 vacation weeks and the 1 waiting week took up that month. We had enough money in the bank that life went on as normal – we just didn’t spend any extra, we didn’t go out to eat, we didn’t go to the movies. Cutting out all unnecessary spending opened my eyes to the kind of money we did spend in some areas. Because there was enough coming in, neither of us had paid much attention to some of the conveniences that were going out. (After all, life shouldn’t be all work and no play, right?)

If we hadn’t had our Emergency Fund, life would have been a completely different story. We would have been in financial trouble fast, as fast as the bills came due. We spend $3000 monthly on house, utilities, insurance, and cell phone payments, but that doesn’t count food, gas for the cars, incidentals, etc.

Emergency Funds are as necessary as homeowners insurance is if you own your home, as necessary as car insurance is if you drive a car. Everyone should have an Emergency Fund. If you don’t have one, you need to start one. Don’t tell me you can’t afford one – you can’t afford NOT to have one!

An Emergency Fund is intended to replace income if you can’t work, but it’s also nice to have when the car needs major repair or the AC unit quits on a 100 degree day in July.

Most financial planners recommend having 3-6 months worth of living expenses saved. But, due to the state of the economy, the average length of time a person is unemployed these days is 9 months (Bureau of Labor Statistics). If you’ve only got a 3 month cushion, what are you going to do the other 6 months when the rent is due, and you’re still looking for work? I know what you’re thinking – you’ve got those credit cards in your billfold, and you’ll fall back on those if you really need to. Let me ask you this: when the credit line is used up, how are you going to repay that debt?

Starting and regularly adding to your Emergency Fund may feel daunting, and may seem like an insurmountable task.   The good news is, you may not need as much as you think. Sit down and make a list of every single bill you pay every month. Go through your bank statement and write down all debit card transactions and what they were for. Check the bank statement for ATM cash withdrawals, and write down what those were for. Get out your credit card statements and add those transactions to the list of money going out for the month. Add all the numbers up.

Now, cut out what isn’t absolutely necessary. The mortgage payment is necessary. $5 at Starbucks twice a week is not. Look closely at bills such as cell phone, cable, gym memberships, newspaper delivery, lawn care – if it came down to it, are these as necessary as food and electricity? No?  Cut those out. Once you figure out the basic living expenses you need to survive, multiple that by 12. Write that number down. Your savings goal is 12 months of basic living expenses in an Emergency Fund.

Work out a savings plan, even if all you can do is save $1 a week, or $25 a month, or the change from your pocket at the end of the day. Put that money in savings and forget it. Cut out one or both of those lattes every week and put that money in savings instead. Treat your Emergency Fund like it’s your water or gas bill, figure out how much you can save regularly, and pay the savings account just like it’s the mortgage company.  Start today.

I was glad we had savings to fall back on. We spent a lot of it, and it went faster than planned because the AC unit did break down on the hottest day of the year, along with a few other things.

During the 5th week of unemployment, the phone rang and MrBP was offered a job – at the opposite end of the state. A 3 hour drive, one way, from the home we’ve lived in for the last 24 years. Whoa.

The new job – and where it was at – brought up a lot of questions: were we going to relocate? Sell our home here? Rent it out? Rent in the new location, or buy? Where would MrBP live for the near future – with family in that area, and if so, for how long? How much was all of this going to cost? There were so many variables and many unknowns six months ago!  A few things didn’t work out, while great truths were learned … stay tuned to find out what happened!

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Oct
04

Free One-on-One Financial Planning Help

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Financial Planning Day What is Financial Planning?

What financial goals would you like to obtain?  What’s on your “Wish List” when it comes to money?

Do you want to buy a home?  Do you own your home, but dream about a vacation home in the mountains or a weekend home at the lake?

Do the kids want to go to Disney World next summer, but you’re not sure you can afford a local pool pass for the season?

Are you able to save today for college for the kids, or have you put that off until tomorrow? Tomorrow is already here, you know.

What about your retirement – how many retirement accounts do you have, and do you regularly fund those to the max?  Is your retirement diversified, or do you have all of your eggs in one basket?  Can you retire without Social Security and live in the manner to which you are now accustomed?  Have you thought about retirement very much, or is that something you’re going to do “tomorrow”?

Financial planning is a must, no matter who you are or what your circumstances are.  What is your financial plan right now?  What strategy do you have in place – right now – that will allow you to retire financially independent?  Do you know where to start to make your financial dreams your reality?  Do you know how to make your dreams your reality?  Are you lost when it comes to implementing changes to your money situation?

We all have money dreams, but most of us aren’t smart enough to know how to make our dreams come true.  We don’t have the time to do the research we need in order to know where to invest, or how, or how much.  We don’t know what goal to tackle first.  We aren’t sure of the quickest way to the goal line.  We’re lost when it comes to the math.  We need help.  During the month of October 2012, personal, one-on-one help is available in many cities across the country.

Financial Planning Days Initiative

During the month of October 2012, “Financial Planning Days Initiative” is taking place.  Four different non-profit organizations**  are bringing together highly qualified, professional, Certified Financial Planners to provide one-on-one counseling sessions to the public.  There will also be classroom style learning sessions held, and free packets of financial literature given away.  All of the work being done by the professionals is on a volunteer basis, and no payment is expected.  Services are free.  You can sit down with a financial planner and ask for personal advice – with no strings attached.  The volunteers will not try to sell you anything, they won’t even give you their business card.  No business will be promoted at all – the professionals are there to answer your questions and help – that’s it.  (If you are a professional, certified financial planner and would like to volunteer, you can find out how here)

Gather your questions about retirement planning, debt, credit issues, budget questions, taxes, college, mortgage loans, investments, estate planning, small business finance, and insurance together, and find out if the Initiative is available where you live:

Click here to find a Financial Planning Day in your area

A list of 2012 events can be found by clicking here

A list of participating states:

  • Arizona
  • California
  • Colorado
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Maryland
  • Minnesota
  • Nebraska
  • New Jersey
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Texas
  • Virgina
  • Washington

Can’t go?  You Can Still Get the Same Information Packet Being Handed Out

If there is no Financial Planning Initiative in your state, the free information packet information is still available to you and can be found at the links below.  Take a look at the information available, and give yourself a quick education in the basics of financial planning.  Pick up tips and advice on everything from a college savings plan to long term care insurance.

You Can Organize & Simplify Your Financial Life:  A How To Guide

Saving and Investing:  A Roadmap to Your Financial Security Through Saving and Investing

Savings Fitness:  A Guide to Your Money & Your Financial Future

Smart Saving for College – 529 Plans & Other College Savings Options

Guide to Disability Income Insurance

Guide to Long Term Care Insurance

Consumer Guide to Financial Self-Defense

 

** Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc.®, Financial Planning Association®, the Foundation for Financial Planning, and the U.S. Conference of Mayors

 

 

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