Sep
18

Helpful Hands

By
Today’s post is my first guest blogger, a fellow writer I’ve known for many years. A. T. Weaver is the pen name of an elderly woman living in Eastern Kansas, author of 3 books and more than 1 blog.  A. T. Weaver – WriterAs I watch the elderly people in my life struggle with fixed incomes vs. rising expenses, I know all too well how every little bit helps. If you are able, donate to your local Harvester’s and food banks. When the Post Office has their food drive, hang a sack on the mailbox and put a couple of cans or boxes in it. Two cans of beans may not mean much to you, but it can be a meal for someone. I’ll never forget seeing an elderly gentleman ahead of me in the check-out lane, counting out pennies and nickles to buy two cans of pork & beans. He opened one of the cans and ate it while sitting on the curb. Your two cans of beans may keep someone from going hungry that day.

Two hands holding loaf of breadAs a senior citizen living on Social Security, sometimes it’s difficult to make ends meet. I live in a HUD subsidized facility so my rent is not as high as it would be otherwise, however it is still one-third of my income. There are several organizations that help seniors with financial problems.

Where I live we have two organizations that come in every week. One is the New Life Family Church in Kansas City, Kansas. Every Monday, they bring in bread and pastries that would otherwise be thrown out. Now that may not seem like a lot – a free loaf of bread – but if you’ve been to the grocery store lately, you know the cost of bread can be over $2.00 a loaf. Most of the items are dated either ‘today’ or ‘yesterday’ but they are still edible. Of course there are those in my building who complain about the type of bread they bring. Today I went downstairs and there were at least ten or twelve baguettes left. Most of the seniors here don’t like baguettes or French bread. It makes good garlic toast or cheese bread.

Another organization is Village Church. Every Monday they come and pick up our ‘Senior Center Shopping List’. We can choose two canned vegetables, two soups/sauces, one canned meat, one staple (sugar, flour, rice, cake mix, etc.), one dairy, one snacks/chips, one fresh vegetable or fruit, and bread. One week a month they will bring peanut butter, fruit or juice, and personal & household items. i.e. dish soap, laundry soap, hand soap, toothpaste, toilet paper. Now they only bring one roll of toilet paper which doesn’t last a whole month, but that’s a roll we don’t have to buy.

Then on Thursday, they deliver what we’ve asked for. They have a contract with Trader Joes and often bring fresh fruit and vegetables. They also bring bread and pastries from area grocery stores. Again, these items may be dated ‘today’ but they are still edible. Then we fill out a new list and send our bag back to be refilled.

Since my building has the Village Church delivery, we don’t have a Harvesters’ distribution. However, there is a distribution once a month at a location in Olathe where we can go and get fresh fruit and vegetables and again, bread and pastries. If you have a car or someone with whom you can get a ride, it’s a good deal. I usually take one other lady with me. I would take more, but by the time we get a walker and a cart and two boxes of food in the car, there is no more room.  Two hands holding pineapple

One other source of food is the Government Commodities. While the other distributions are for anyone in the building, you must qualify for Commodities. One other problem with them is the fact that so many seniors have problems with what they can eat. For example I am diabetic. There are a lot of foods I can’t eat in the Commodities bags so I quit taking them.

There are many months when these services mean whether or not seniors have a meal on the table. I for one am very grateful for these helpful hands.

 

 Helpful Resources:Feeding America is the nation’s leading domestic hunger-relief charityGovernment Emergency Food Assistance Program (Food Commodities)

Harvester’s

Find a local food bank (Feeding America)

Food Stamp & WIC Program Apply Online

Meals on Wheels

Find Free Food

Global Food Banking Network

 

 

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